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How to test different resolutions – Part two – Firefox resolutions testing

Continuing from the last months Chrome resolution testing, we are going to test tools from Firefox. None of the tools listed simulate mobile devices. So for mobile testing the mobile web address will have to be manually used, as the browser won’t be recognized as a mobile device. Unfortunately this will not work with every site, and even on sites that work, some pages may not be displayed correctly.

FireSizer

This add-on uses the Add-on bar at the bottom of the Firefox window. Unfortunately this feature was removed in Firefox version 29+, so an additional add-on is required to make it work (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/the-addon-bar/). After installing the add-on bar it will appear at the bottom of the screen, from where the FireSizer can be used. The FireSizer will be located in the bottom right of the screen. It will show only as the current window resolution, right clicking the displayed resolution shows additional options. You can select from existing presets, or add you own. You can also save the current window size. This add-on doesn’t resize only the HTML area (viewport), but takes into account window borders, top/bottom status bars, menus, navigation buttons, etc. This isn’t so good for mobile testing, but makes more sense for desktop testing.

How to test different resolutions – Part one – Chrome resolutions testing

Often testing can mean checking a sites pages in different resolutions. When a site gets a new layout, it is important to make sure it displays correctly on different browsers and resolutions. While adjusting the resolution manually is an option, it takes too long.
In this post we will talk about resolution testing on Chrome. We were testing some possibilities, and will share our experience with you. We tried a few extensions to see which of them can speed up or make our work easier for us.
Their drawback of these extensions is that web-sites won’t recognize small resolutions as handheld devices, because the browser windows are only re-sized. This unfortunately means that you can’t see what a site would look like, on Chrome, on a mobile device. However they are still useful for desktop testing, and if you don’t want to pay for the service, the following extensions are a must try.