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Google App Engine

Make your manual testing faster with Vysor

Testing Android devices can be frustrating. Entering long texts, taking screenshots and screen recordings, transferring files from the Android device to PC, losing time just with putting down – picking up the deviceScreen capture from Vysor. All these things can be forgotten if You could use the Android device on your PC.
 
There are many apps available for screen mirroring and Vysor is one of them. Vysor is a Chrome extension developed by ClockworkMod. Because it’s a Chrome extension it is compatible with almost all operating system and devices. Vysor works using ADB (Android Debug Bridge). The Chrome app automatically detects any ADB-enabled device connected to the computer. With a few simple steps the phone or tablet screen will be available on the PC with full control over it. It has a free and a paid version. Free version, with screen mirroring and screenshotting, is probably enough for most of the users. If you want some more functionalities like higher quality mirroring, fullscreen mode, sharing, drag and drop option, paid version is for you.

 

How to set up Vysor?

Genymotion review

Genymotion is an Android tablet and phone emulator from the company Genymobile. It is available for Mac OS, Windows (x64/x86) and Linux platforms.

The description on the product page describing it as “Fast, simple and powerful” certainly fits it well. It boasts considerable speed, leaving its competitors in the dust. It boasts quite a number of pre-configured devices including Samsung Galaxy, Google Nexus, and Sony Xperia series of phones. You can also make a custom phone or tablet to suit your needs. The paid version offers additional powerful functions.

Servlet Mapping for Google App Engine and Spring

This post is all about Spring MVC 3 and Google App Engine and their interaction.

The starting point for this project was the Google App Engine’s documentation, the Google Eclipse plugin, and some tutorials found on various sites.

After reading all about the App Engine and Spring, the first thing to do was to create a project in our favorite editor, Eclipse. This generated some necessary files, and gave us a good starting point. As we want to use Spring to perform all its magic, we’ve created a web.xml like this:

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>dispatcher</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>org.springframework.web.servlet.DispatcherServlet</servlet-class>
    <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
</servlet>

<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>dispatcher</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>